It Came! It Finally Came!

I was so happy to receive my contributor’s copy of the Inaugural Edition of Copperfield Review Quarterly. After all, I was a contributor! I never dreamed I’d attempt to write a Shakespearean sonnet about Henry VIII, much less that it would be published in such an esteemed literary journal of historical fiction and poetry.

I would like to thank the editor of CRQ, Meredith Allard, for this amazing honor.

I’m proud to finally share with everyone A Day in the Life of Henry VIII. Such an infamous monarch’s daily to-do list couldn’t possibly contain such mundane things as cleaning and errands. In this sonnet, Henry VIII takes it upon himself to change his marriage, the church, and God Himself, all in the pursuit of securing his progeny.

The image of God in his ire does speak

that a more painful hell than this awaits.

But I am King and this one change I seek:

‘tis my desire and creed which should dictate

the right of man to set aside his wife

who through devilry and spite does founder

to achieve her purpose to create life;

whether by ties or death should he sever

them from this most sacred and solemn vow,

he can be assured of his rightful choice

and take such succor as offered him now,

be it food or skin above a rich bodice!

Whoever she be, shall she be my queen

or be hanged for failure to make a king?

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July Reading Wrap Up!

Despite being on vacation for a week, I managed to read seven books for a total of 1,977 pages. That makes 56 books in 2021 so far. My lofty goal is to reach 100 total books for the year. Wish me luck! I’m going to need it.

  • Morning in the Burned House by Margaret Atwood
  • Magic Lessons by Alice Hoffman
  • The Boleyn Inheritance by Philippa Gregory
  • The Deep by Rivers Solomon
  • Good Bones by Maggie Smith
  • The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab
  • The Antelope Wife by Louise Erdrich

I enjoyed The Deep, Good Bones, and The Boleyn Inheritance the most. The titular poem of Good Bones is one I will most likely revisit a lot. The Deep was a lyrical, thoughtful Afrofuturist story based on the song The Deep by clipping., and it was also quite emotional at times.

I enjoyed The Antelope Wife the least. It was just a struggle to read. I’m not sure why, but I felt lost for much of the novel. Maybe it was due to a cultural divide, or I lost track of all the characters and plot lines. I tried hard to like it but it fell short of the mark.

What did you read this month? Was it a good reading month? Which book did you enjoy the most? The least?

House Cleaning

I’ve made some changes around here! Finally, my website reflects the new, married me. As do all my social media links, and let me tell you, it was not easy to change over. My married name is ten times more common than my maiden name, and it took me dozens of tries to find usernames that work. I never used to like my maiden name, but it was, at least, distinguishing.

The name of my website isn’t the only thing that’s changed. I began this site to launch a freelance editing career, but that has fallen by the wayside. I admit, I was naïve and very ignorant to how hard it actually is to break into the market. I realize now, it might not be something that’s achievable for me. At least, not without a degree and experience to back me up. Though I have confidence in my ability to help authors, I know it’s my word against…nothing.

I’d still like to offer editing services to those in need of it, especially to freelance or up-and-coming authors who need an editor but can’t pay the exorbitant prices of established editors. If that’s you or someone you know, let’s chat! I’d love nothing more than to assist you.

But editing is not the focus of this website anymore. It hasn’t been for a long time.

In the past year, I’ve come to a realization. One I never truly believed I would reach. It turns out, I CAN make a splash in the literary world, that my poetry IS something publishers are interested in, and that’s become my main focus. I’ve had three poems published, one in an acclaimed literary magazine, and I just sent out a micro-chapbook to a contest. I can’t say whether or not I’ll win, but I am confident in the quality of the chapbook. If it doesn’t win the contest, there are other avenues I’d like to explore with it.

I’m loving falling in love with poetry again and gaining more confidence in my writing. And that’s what I’d like to focus on now. I hope this only means good things for my career as a poet.

It’s Publication Day!

Finally, the day I’ve been waiting for. My Shakespearean sonnet A Day in the Life of Henry VIII has had its debut in Copperfield Review Quarterly and I couldn’t be prouder. Seeing my name in print for the first time, and in such an acclaimed literary publication, has me feeling a little teary. I hope this only means good things for my future as a poet.

Please consider supporting me and this great publication. You can purchase digital or print copies of the quarterly on Copperfield Review Quarterly’s website. There’s so much on offer in this edition! Read about handling resistance with Steven Pressfield; Ann Taylor is in the poet spotlight; and, of course, there are plenty of short stories and poems to enjoy.

Get your copy today!

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June Reading Wrap Up!

Another month wherein I read a lot of poetry. Unfortunately, it didn’t translate into writing a lot of poetry. It seems my writing well has dried up for now, but I’m trying not to feel discouraged. Even the most powerful batteries have to recharge!

In June, I read nine books for a total of 2,584 pages. So far this year, I’ve read 49 books. I’ll definitely be extending my 2021 reading goals from 60 books to 80. July probably won’t be a big reading month for me, though. I’m going on vacation from July 8th to July 15th, and though I’d like to think I’ll get some reading done, realistically, I know I won’t. I may not even bother packing a book. If I do find time to read, that’s what my phone and ebooks are for!

  • Libertie by Kaitlyn Greenidge
  • Helium by Rudy Francisco
  • Black Movie by Danez Smith
  • This is How it Always Is by Laurie Frankel
  • The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune
  • The Book of Pride by Mason Funk
  • Deaf Republic by Ilya Kaminsky
  • The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory
  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

I most enjoyed The House in the Cerulean Sea and Deaf Republic. The House… was enchanting, and Deaf Republic was gritty and raw. Two very different books but both excellent. I least enjoyed Helium. The poetry was good but not great. I haven’t had good luck with poetry this year. If anyone has any recommendations, hit me with ’em.

What did you read this month? Was it a good reading month? Which book did you enjoy the most? The least?

Here Comes the Bride

I married my significant other of nine years yesterday! Honestly, it was about time. It was a simple ceremony performed by a Justice of the Peace, but I got to marry the man I love in front of all my friends and family, so it was simply perfect.

In honor of my nuptials, I want to share a poem I wrote about us a few years ago.

Units of Measurement

How do you measure a relationship?
In years?
We’ve lasted four.
I’d try to get it down to the second,
but I’m bad at math.

Anyway,
I think I’d rather measure ours
in moments:

Like the first night we spent together
and stayed up until 3am talking
about…you know, I’ve forgotten,
but the sound of your voice
was a roll of thunder over my skin,
and, oh, how I wished your fingers had chased the sounds.

We were so silly
the day we decided to move in together
as a solution to our first real argument.
But I was frustrated–I missed you,
and you, you won’t admit it,
but you missed me too,
and even though it was stupid,
it worked out all right in the end.

I remember the night I came home
from visiting my parents
and you said my new hair color was beautiful
and we tumbled into bed together
and some months and days later
we named our son after your grandfather.

It’s weird, isn’t it,
that buying a house together was scarier
than those 16 hours of pain.

A lot can happen in four years.
I’m curious to see what the next
three years will bring–
maybe a daughter?

We did get our daughter, by the way. She has her father’s eyes. ♥

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Bird Watching: A Poem

Photo by Brian Forsyth on Pexels.com

I track grief like birds
in the crosshairs of my binoculars.
A cross marks the spot
where my heart lies.

Cardinals are meant for mourning,
singing dirges in key major
like blood pumping.
They’re resplendent in red,
so when you see them,
you know a little piece of Heaven
sings for you.

I don’t believe in Heaven,
but I believe in birds.
I think if ever I
see my grandmother again,
it will be as a dot of red
against a field of blue.

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Joker’s Right: A Poem

Bringing it back to a time when I thought I was clever–and could actually rhyme!

Though I fancied myself as a rather mysterious person, multiple people told me they could “read me like an open book.” I didn’t like that, so this was my response to them.

In hindsight, I probably wasn’t as mysterious as I pretended to be.

Complicated beyond comprehension,
but what’s to comprehend
when it’s all a game?
I like to play pretend.
A bag of tricks
and some joker’s quick wit
brings the crowd their kicks.
Now it’s the clown being played,
though I’d gladly condescend to claim
you know the face behind the name.

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May Reading Wrap Up!

I’d like to start sharing my reading list here. On the last day of every month, I’ll post a wrap up. Feel free to share yours; let’s talk books!

I read a lot of poetry this month. Which means I also wrote a lot of poetry. If I keep up this pace, I’ll definitely be able to put together a chapbook by the end of the year.

This month, I read nine books for a total of 1,950 pages. In total, I’ve read 40 books this year–67% of my personal goal! This will be the first year I read 60+ books. I’m determined to be successful.

  • War of the Foxes by Richard Siken                                                       
  • Piranesi by Susanna Clarke                                                                  
  • Autopsy by Donte Collins                                                                    
  • Three Sisters, Three Queens by Philippa Gregory                              
  • Midnight Blue by Simone Van Der Vlugt                                             
  • Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen                                                 
  • This is the Fire by Don Lemon                                                             
  • Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn                                                           
  • Swan by Mary Oliver                                                                   

Of these nine books, I enjoyed Piranesi the most. It’s such a weird little book! I loved it and wish I could visit that world. I least enjoyed Swan, which is odd, because I usually love Mary Oliver’s poetry. This collection just didn’t do it for me, though. Oh well; can’t enjoy ’em all!

What about you? Was it a good reading month for you? What book did you enjoy the most? The least?